Events

UO Straub Hall Art Blessing

Artist Garrick Imatani spoke at the Blessing Ceremony for the installation of his artwork at UO Straub Hall. The installation includes a sculpture of the Tomanowas (Willamette Meteorite), sacred to the Clackamas (now part of the Grand Ronde tribe), that floats in front of a mural of the Missoula Floods. This installation is part of the Percent for Art project by the state of Oregon. For more on the installation, see Sculpture of Meteorite Installed in Straub Hall Atrium.

PV 4 BV Solar Initiative and DisOrient Film Festival

When possible, Rowell Brokaw enjoys sponsoring projects and events in Eugene. One project that has been completed in time for Earth Day is the installation of solar panels (or photovoltaic cells) on the roof of Buena Vista Elementary School. The school was awarded a grant from EWEB's Greenpower program for their "PV 4 BV Solar Initiative" project, which will give "real time" energy data in the classroom to support class projects. Here's an educational video (both in English and in Spanish) developed alongside the project by Attic Media:

Another event, that we are very proud to help sponsor, is occurring this weekend: the DisOrient Film Festival. Here is the festival's mission: "DisOrient is the premiere Asian American, social justice film festival of Oregon. Our films—'By us, for us and about us'—break open the one-dimensional stereotype of the 'Oriental.' We believe in the power of film to inform, heal and connect people. We bring power to our voice as we share our stories and advocate for social justice."

Hope to see you at the event and Happy Earth Day!

Annual UO AIAS Reverse Crit

From left to right: Frank Visconti, Patrick A. McKechnie, Kurt Albrecht, Chuck Bailey, and Nir Pearlson.

Rowell Brokaw participated in this year's Reverse Crit. The event took place at the Hayden Gallery in the University of Oregon's College of Design and was hosted by the UO chapter of the American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) in partnership with AIA-SWO. Students had the opportunity to turn the tables and weigh in on architects' current, real-world projects. Frank Visconti presented the Eureka Veterans and Homeless Housing project and garnered an award for Spatial Composition.

Groundbreaking for Tykeson Hall

Willie Tykeson, President Michael Schill, Dean Andrew Marcus, and Kathryn Sternberger ('17) broke ground for Tykeson Hall, a $39 million facility devoted to liberal arts education and career development at the University of Oregon. In this innovative project, academic and career advising will be housed under one roof, allowing undergrads to realize the career possibilities behind their academic choices. As Dean Marcus explains, "We want to help students navigate college intentionally and give them the ability to articulate the specific skills they’ve acquired. How can they map their valuable liberal arts education and experiences to careers? We need to give them the vocabulary, facts and concrete evidence of their own performance that will help build their portfolios and make a good case to employers. This building is not only a symbol of this aspiration but a tool that will help us reach it." 

Grand Opening of the Arts & Technology Academy

Superintendent Gustavo Balderas, 4J board members, and Principal Larry Williams with the ceremonial ribbon

The grand opening of the Eugene 4J Arts & Technology Academy at the Jefferson Middle School featured a ribbon cutting, student performances, and architectural tours of the building. The design of the new building supports ATA’s innovative STEM program, which integrates science, technology, engineering, and math into the curriculum in hands-on, real-world ways. For a more in-depth explanation of the design, see the brochure we created for the event:

Soft Opening of Hot Mama’s Kitchen+Bar

RB Staff enjoyed some wings and drinks at the soft opening of Hot Mama’s Kitchen+Bar in Oakway Center. The new space has a 12-seat teak wood bar, a 90-seat dining room, a 40-seat mezzanine level, and a 20-seat outdoor area.

For more on Hot Mama’s new restaurant: http://registerguard.com/rg/business/bluechip/35672946-62/hot-mamas-gets-its-chance-to-shine.html.csp.

Britni Jessup receives 20 Under 40 Award

By Sherri Buri McDonald, blue chip
The Register-Guard
December 5, 2016

20 UNDER 40

Britni Jessup

Architect, Rowell Brokaw Architects; Age: 35

Britni Jessup has brought a new focus on interior architecture to Rowell Brokaw in Eugene and shared her skills, in and out of architecture, as a volunteer in the community.

Jessup is one of only three interior architects in Eugene accredited by the National Council of Interior Design Qualification, according to a letter nominating her for a 20 Under 40 award.

“In just a few short years with Rowell Brokaw Architects, she has led interior design projects for high-profile public and private clients,” Angie Marzano, business development director for BRING Recycling, wrote in the nomination letter.

Recent projects include two of the largest lecture halls at the University of Oregon: a 509-seat room in Straub Hall and a 451-seat room in Columbia Hall. Jessup also has helped design the interiors of Northwest Community Credit Union’s headquarters in Eugene and the offices of Roseburg, a wood products company, in Springfield’s Gateway area.

“Her work focuses on designing total interior environments that fulfill the unique goals and aspirations of companies and institutions, branding their physical workplace identity and creating innovative work environments,” Marzano said.

Jessup earned bachelor’s degrees in business administration and Spanish at the University of Washington. She earned a master’s degree in architecture at the University of Oregon.

Jessup actively volunteers in local schools and libraries. She is a member of the Eugene Public Library Foundation’s Imagination Library Advisory Board. Jessup and two other parents of children at Buena Vista Spanish Immersion School started a green initiative to help make the school more sustainable.

Jessup is a former University of Washington volleyball player . She is assistant varsity volleyball coach at Sheldon High School and part owner in Blue Skies Beach Club, a beach volleyball group that organizes camps, clinics and tournaments .

“She is young, dynamic and deserves to be standing among a group of business professionals nominated for this award,” Marzano said.

Marathon Madness at Crescent Village this past weekend

RB's Frank Visconti, who lives in Crescent Village, snapped this photo from his balcony on Saturday at the start of the second annual Pacific Northwest Marathon.  Starting and finishing at Crescent Village, the Pacific Northwest Marathon is one of the flattest marathons in Oregon. Race organizers say it's a good race for beginners and a chance to help runners qualify for the Boston Marathon. In 2015, more than 10% of the marathon finishers qualified for Boston.

For race results and more photos visit: http://www.pacificnorthwestmarathon.com/

Fred Kent, Project for Public Spaces visits Eugene

Kaarin Knudson takes AIA SWO Design Excellence speaker, Fred Kent, on a walking tour of Eugene (photo by Terri Harding)

Fred Kent, founder and president of Project for Public Spaces (PPS), visited Eugene last week as part of the AIA SWO Design Excellence Making Great Cities Lecture Series. He is known throughout the world as a dynamic speaker and prolific ideas man. A leading authority on revitalizing city spaces and one of the foremost thinkers in livability, smart growth and the future of the city, Fred shared his knowledge and wisdom to a 200+ audience at the Hult Center for the Performing Arts.

Traveling over 150,000 miles each year, Fred offers technical assistance to communities and gives major talks across North America and internationally. Each year, he and the PPS staff give presentations or train more than 10,000 people in Placemaking techniques.

For additional information:
SW Oregon Architect's blog post "Placemaking – Making it Happen" 
PPS blog post "Eight Placemaking Principals for Innovation Districts"

The Night for Sight 2016 Gala

We were proud to sponsor The Give Me Sight Foundation Gala which which helps Dr. John Haines and his team purchase surgical supplies and equipment to bring sight to our world’s blind. 

Last Saturday evening, the Shedd Institute welcomed Dr. Haines and friends as they presented the 5th annual A NIGHT FOR SIGHT benefit concert and dinner in celebration and support of his work.

This past February Dr. Haines completed his 25th mission in Thailand and Myanmar. In 2012, he and his wife, Joy, established The Give Me Sight Foundation as a mechanism to raise funds and expand the scope of their mission to return the gift of sight to underserved people around the world.

Rowell Brokaw first met John and Joy Haines when  Rowell Brokaw was selected to design their Oregon Eye iLasik and Refractive Center. Their commitment to bringing sight to those in need is admirable and inspiring. 

RB staff and their kiddos help out at Edison's Garden Work Party

Two Edison Elementary students (and kiddos of four RB staff) work hard to build a Tasting Stand at the school's latest garden work party. The Tasting Stand is being constructed through a City of Eugene Neighborhoods Matching Grant. 

RB architect, Lorri Nelson is also an instructor with the UO Service Learning Program through the College of Education where she co-teaches "The Schoolhouse Garden at Edison Elementary School" class. This class brings UO students together with Edison Elementary teachers, students, and families to build and grow a garden. Students learn about food justice, nutrition, and sustainability practices.

The Tasting Stand is like a farm stand, where UO students serve harvested fruits and veggies from the school garden to kids in the garden. Yumm! 

 

 

Rowell Brokaw chats with students at the UO A&AA Recruitment Fair

Rowell Brokaw enjoyed meeting UO Architecture students this past month at the 2016 A&AA Recruitment Fair. Architecture, landscape architecture, interior architecture and planning firms were widely represented in the daylong event that took place on two floors in Lawrence Hall. The event attracted thirty companies actively seeking students for employment including full-time positions for graduates as well as summer internships. The event was organized by the A&AA Office of Professional Outreach and Development for Students (PODS).

UO AIAS "Reverse-Crit" event: RB's 33 East Broadway wins Best Overall Design award

This past Monday, five AIA-SWO architecture firms presented "on the board" projects for the 2016 "Reverse Crit" (Professional Pin-Up) at Lawrence Hall on the University of Oregon campus. A popular, annual event, jointly coordinated by members of the AIA-SWO Chapter and the UO American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS), gives UO architecture students the opportunity to "reverse the table" on AIA-SWO professionals and comment on real-world projects. At the end of the event, projects were awarded by student ballot. Rowell Brokaw's 33 East Broadway won two awards for most creative use of materials and best overall design.

The AIA-SWO firms who participated this year projects were:
- Pivot Architecture / Provo-Orem BRT
- Rowell Brokaw Architects / 33 East Broadway
- Robertson Sherwood Architects / Roosevelt Middle School
- Chuck Bailey Architect / Ninkasi Administration Building
- Will Dixon Architects / Black Apron Bistro

 

Feeling Festive!

Rowell Brokaw celebrates the holidays at Membrillo Latin Cafe, a new eatery in Eugene's Midtown District

2 East Broadway (2EB) project featured in Open for Business mag

 

LAST CALL
by Dave Hauser
feature in Open for Business
December 2015/January 2016 issue

Remarkable progress, yet much more work needs to be done.

The Eugene Area Chamber of Commerce believe that a healthy downtown is important to business. It is an important symbol of our community's economic health, quality of life, and self-esteem. In addition, today, more than ever before, attracting and retaining talent to fuel new economic opportunities is vital. Cities with fun, active, vibrant downtowns clearly have a leg-up in attracting and keeping the creative class, the talent that will drive the next economy. 

Downtown Eugene has made remarkable strides recently. With outstanding support from the City of Eugene, developers, DEI, the Eugene Chamber and  many others there has been over $300 million invested in our downtown over the past five years. It is astounding to reflect on the long list of projects completed or are underway. These new investments have brought residents, students, businesses, people and positive energy to downtown. 

While we are proud of what has been accomplished, we know the journey to a great downtown is far from complete. That is why our Chamber enthusiastically supports the proposed 2 East Broadway (2EB) mixed-use project. The proposed six-story, multi-use building would include market-rate apartments and open, accessible ground floor rental space. The project proposes to purchase the Broadway Plaza/Kesey Square from the City of Eugene. 

  • 2EB would build on the momentum currently underway in downtown. More housing and additional retail space are key to continued downtown progress. 
  • The corner of Broadway and Willamette represents the center of downtown Eugene and it currently only has three corners that are active year-round. 2EB will allow for greater, more inclusive activity at the main downtown intersection and in the process, helping to support he many new restaurants and retail businesses around it. 
  • While 2EB would displace underutilized public plaza in the core, downtown will see a net increase and improvement in public space with projects such as the new City Hall complete with a public plaza roughly twice the size of Kesey Square, a long overdue renovation of the Park Blocks, better use of the Hult Center Plaza and ultimately a new riverfront park as a component of the EWEB redevelopment
  • The 2EB development team is made of local business people who are enduring champions of downtown Eugene. 

Progress is rarely achieved without change. We believe that the 2EB projects represents the kind of positive change that can result in another important step in the journey toward a downtown that is fun, active, vibrant asset to attract and keep talent that drives economic prosperity. 

2E Broadway concept presented at the Chamber's Young Entrepreneurs event

A  short presentation about the 2E Broadway concept was held on November 13 at Oveissi as part of the Chamber's Young Entrepreneurs event. Those present had the chance to ask questions and the opportunity to contribute to this conversation! 

Learn more here:
 
http://www.2eastbroadway.com/

SERA / LCL shout-out

The RB office recently toured the SERA/LCL designed University of Oregon EMU Renovation project. It was great to see the work progressing quickly and coming into shape. The program for the student union building included a multipurpose room, and numerous meeting rooms in addition to the more traditional program elements of a student union. Project completion is expected in 2016.

Additional Links
Project Progress Video
Before and After Video

Eugene City Hall featured in KLCC Interview

Last November, Rowell Brokaw visited Camas Ridge and Prairie Mountain Elementary Schools to introduce plans for new City Hall. Since then, students and the project team have been working to develop big ideas for a new civic plaza. Today, KLCC reported on the students' work to envision a City Hall plaza full of life, laser tag, fresh vegetables, and honeybees.

 Isabella Shaft and Barbara Elliott are all smiles after Mayor Kitty Piercy gave them a glowing review of their design for the plaza for the new city hall. CREDIT ANGELA KELLNER

Isabella Shaft and Barbara Elliott are all smiles after Mayor Kitty Piercy gave them a glowing review of their design for the plaza for the new city hall. CREDIT ANGELA KELLNER

Eugene City Hall From A Kids' Eye View

KLCC Interview by Angela Kellner
Published: May 29, 2015

 

As City of Eugene staff continue to refine plans for the new city hall, students at Camas Ridge Elementary shared their design ideas with the mayor this week.

Inside Donna Dubois' 4th/5th grade class, teams of students proudly show off their city hall plaza designs to Mayor Kitty Piercy. They glued down small pebbles to make pathways, painted plastic lids to represent fountains and added green material to represent grass.

Barbara Elliot and Isabella Shaft got the Mayor's attention with the small details of their multi-dimensional design.

Elliot: "We wanted a greenhouse for anyone in the community to plant any of their seeds they had from home. Making sure we have enough garden soil in our community."

Shaft: "And we also have a lot of fruit trees and stuff."

Mayor Piercy: "You guys did a lot of work on this."

Elliot: "We wanted it to be really creative and fun for anyone to come in. So I go to meetings with my uncle many times and I always want to make sure little kids have time to go play if they have a brother, an older brother they can go playing.

Shaft: "And then we have a pond for the fish. You can throw coins in the pond or the fountain and it'll all go like to an animal shelter or Food For Lane County."

Mayor: "So you have benches all around, right?

Elliot: "Yes."

Mayor: "I can see them, so you can enjoy all parts of it, right? Thanks so much for showing it to me you guys."

At another desk, Mayor Piercy found out what was most important to a group of boys.

Boys: "You could also play games."

Mayor: "Places to eat and have fun, right? Yup, yup. And this here?"

Boys: "Laser tag and paintball."

Mayor: "Oh it looks like a laser tag place. You did a good job on that."

Laser tag was a popular theme with the boys. The mayor says she'll have to think about that one.

 Elizabeth Danforth and Olivia Carol stand with Mayor Kitty Piercy after showing her their city hall plaza design ideas. CREDIT ANGELA KELLNER

Elizabeth Danforth and Olivia Carol stand with Mayor Kitty Piercy after showing her their city hall plaza design ideas. CREDIT ANGELA KELLNER

"I'm Elizabeth Danforth."

"I'm Olivia Carol."

They were the last students to show off their design ideas to Mayor Piercy.

Girls: "That is our beehive."

Mayor: "Where you raise bees there, right?"

Girls: "Yeah, and then the honey goes to the café."

Mayor: "Well you know we passed a resolution to get rid of neonicotinoids to save the bees, so that would be very appropriate."

"Here is our Calapooia art room. And I was hoping that if there are some art projects that summer camps they could go in there and do it or even school field trips."

Mayor Piercy reflects on what she learned from the students.

Mayor: "It makes me think more from a kid's eye than and from adult's eye and what they might like to have to do that would make it meaningful to them. And that includes activities, and open space and food. They're thinking about what would make them want to go to our city hall. Their parents or someone might have to go to meeting and so the kids have to find something else to do, so very thoughtful, very thoughtful."

And 5th grader Isabella Shaft said it would be really cool if the city used any of her ideas in the final project.

Shaft: "Because if we went back there with our kids or grandkids, we could say, this is what we, we helped design this."